Friday, January 6, 2017

Challenge Link-Up Post: 20th Century Classic


Please link your reviews for your 20th Century Classic here.  This is only for the 20th Century Classic category.  All books in this category must have been published between 1900 and 1967 to qualify as classics (except for posthumous publications.  If you do not have a blog, or somewhere public on the internet where you post book reviews, please write your mini-review/thoughts in the comments section.  If you like, you can include the name of your blog and/or the title of the book in your link, like this: "Karen K. @ Books and Chocolate (East of Eden)."
  



14 comments:

  1. Thanks Karen. just added my first book to the challenge for 2017.

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  2. Added my link for James' The Ambassadors.

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  3. My computer `blinked' when I tried to upload my link before so I am trying again. This is the first book on my 2017 Classics Challenge journey and I am excited to once more be stretching the boundaries of my reading.

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  4. I read Bonjour Tristesse (Vel møtt, vemod in Norwegian) and it was a pretty good read. Glad I finally found time to read it!

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  5. 1200 pages and many memorable quotes later, I started in January and finished in February Dos Passos' USA Trilogy (comprised of 3 novels entitled The 42d Parallel, 1919, and The Big Money). I was assigned to read a few excerpts in a high school class, but the sheer length and experimental prose deterred 16-year-old me from reading it further. It was for the best I waited until 2017 to read it, though. Dos Passos' observations about misogyny and xenophobia in the early/mid-20th century feel painfully spot-on today (although one of my main criticisms is that, of the numerous POVs he uses, none are POC, which seems odd even for the '20s and '30s). His female characters especially shine against the backdrop of misogyny and injustice he paints, as he describes their daily struggles to escape the narrow parameters within which their families, partners, and society try to confine them. The writing style is not for everyone, but I would definitely recommend at least giving the first novel (42d Parallel) a try.

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  6. Read A Canticle for Liebowitz, a scifi classic.

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  7. Just finished Joseph Conrad's "The Secret Agent" - classic Conrad...which is to say bleak and depressing

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  8. Grapes of Wrath (20th cent) should be required for all interested in American history! https://www.goodreads.com/review/list/31652839-marilyn?shelf=books-and-chocolates-challenge-2017

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  9. I read The Land of Little Rain, by Mary Austin.

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  10. Also The Great Gatsby (20th cent.) It was well written; the language was beautiful, but there are far too many characters who were despicable.

    https://www.goodreads.com/review/list/31652839-marilyn?shelf=books-and-chocolates-challenge-2017

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  11. I think I forgot to add this one in comments a few weeks ago when I read it. The Old Man and the Sea is short, simple, and fairly depressing.

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  12. I was completely blown away by The Cruel Sea, a WWII novel I did not expect to love as much as I did.

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  13. Our Town - A play by Thornton Wilder about life in a small town in New Hampshire. The three acts are set on three different dates (1901, 1904, and 1913). Life, birth, marriage, and death. Life is meant to be lived two by two. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/205476.Our_Town

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  14. Just completed my 20th Century Classic: Appointment in Samarra by John O'Hara. http://100greatestnovelsofalltimequest.blogspot.com/2017/04/appointment-in-samarra-by-john-ohara-80.html

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