Friday, January 6, 2017

Challenge Link-Up Post: Classic Set in a Place You'd Like to Visit


Please link your reviews for your Classic Set in a Place You'd Like to Visit here.  This is only for the Classic Set in a Place You'd Like to Visit category. If you like, include the place (if it isn't obvious) and why you'd like to visit in your review -- I'm sure readers would like to know!

If you do not have a blog, or somewhere public on the internet where you post book reviews, please write your mini-review/thoughts in the comments section.  If you like, you can include the name of your blog and/or the title of the book in your link, like this: "Karen K. @ Books and Chocolate (Death on the Nile). "


15 comments:

  1. The Painted Veil was Naomi Watts was a pretty good movie version, though of course the ending was tampered with. If you like his more obscure novels, The Narrow Corner is worth the time. I'm not sure if Maugham would stand up real well under re-reading.

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  2. A Moveable Feast by Ernest Hemingway covers his life in Paris in the 1920's. I would love to visit Paris!

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  3. Read Down and Out in Paris and London--have wanted to read it for a while, and would love to visit both places!

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  4. I read A Room with a View by E.M. Forster because I'd loved to see Florence some day. :)

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  5. I read A Moveable Feast by Hemingway. I have always wanted to visit paris!! My review is on Goodreads!

    "I absolutely LOVED this book. I am not usually a Hemingway fan. But A Moveable Feast was just amazing!!! The language he uses to describe places, people, and even food is just beautiful!!"

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  6. My choice was Franny and Zooey by J.D. Salinger, which was set in New York. I'm an Aussie who would love to visit America, and especially the Big Apple, just once. It's a strange, but interesting classic.

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  7. I just linked my review of Notre-Dame de Paris by Hugo. Loved it!

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  8. Artemisia by Anna Banti isn't set in just one place, but she grows up in Rome, then moves to Florence with her father, back to Rome, on to Naples to stay for some twenty years before joining her father in London and returning to Rome after his death. Any of these cities would be fine with me!

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  9. I ended up reading Merchant of Venice (Shakespeare!) because I wouldn't mind going there... But I'm a bit of a homebody! Heehee.

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  10. I read The Magician's Nephew. Who wouldn't want to visit Narnia?

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  11. I read After You, Marco Polo. I just visited the many places Marco Polo did with Jean and Franc Shor. Their stay at Huzah was my favorite. *This was a non paralleled visit to Asia.

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  12. I read Alice in Wonderland (both Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass). I had been wanting to read this classic for a long time. I must say I much preferred her adventures in Through the Looking Glass than in Wonderland.

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  13. Dubliners by James Joyce - This book is a collection of 15 essays/short stories set in Dublin about 1900. I felt they were incomplete. The characters were not fully developed nor were the stories. This was more like a collection of story IDEAS to be expanded into stories.

    1. The Sisters - I don't understand why it is called Sisters when in fact it is about the death of Father Flynn, their brother who was a priest.
    2. The Encounter - Two boys skip school for an adventure and meet a rather odd man. Why did they skip and why didn't the third boy? Who is the man? What is his story?
    After this I ceased writing individual comments since there just wasn't much there. And the book did NOT give me a feel for Dublin at all.

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  14. Just posted my link to my thoughts on A Handful of Dust by Evelyn Waugh, set in England and Brazil. I've been to Jolly Ole England, so Brazil is the place (though not under the circumstances of Waugh's character.)

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  15. I changed my original choice to this one set in China: The Small Woman by Alan Burgess.

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